7 Reasons Why You’re Not Ready to Go Multisite

Back in 2012 Leadership Network released a report that said there are now over 5,000 multisite churches in America. That number ballooned to over 8,000 in 2014, and I’m sure it’s well over 10,000 today. And it’s not just big city churches anymore. A growing percentage of smaller rural churches are trying their hand at multisite.

And why not? More churches mean more people, more salvations, more baptisms, more life change.

Why wouldn’t you go multisite?

Maybe because you want to keep your sanity. Maybe because it’s not always the best thing for your church.

I spoke with a pastor recently of a very successful church and asked him when he planned on launching a campus. He told me they had no plans to ever launch one. It wasn’t the vision for his church.

There was something refreshing about that answer because I think a lot of us feel the pressure of going multisite just because it’s the current trend.

That’s a terrible reason to do it, and one that’s doomed to fail.

  1. God hasn’t told you to.

It may be the current trend, but that doesn’t mean God has called you to it. Keep in mind male rompers are the fashion trend of the summer. Just because some people are doing it doesn’t mean you should. Make sure God has called you to multisite.

  1. You don’t have a campus pastor.

You may think you can plug anyone in to be your campus pastor, but that’s definitely not the case. It takes a special person with incredible skills to be able to pull this role off. If you miss on this person, chances are your campus will not survive.

  1. You don’t have enough money.

Whatever you think it’s going to cost you, you probably want to double it. Not only can it cost a lot in the start up phase, but more than likely your sending campus will have to foot a large portion of the bill until the new campus gets on its feet, which could take years.

  1. You don’t have enough leaders.

It could be just my church, but it seems to be getting harder and harder to find people who are willing to step up and lead. When you don’t have enough leaders, the burden falls on a select few and can be too much for them to carry.

  1. You don’t have enough volunteers.

You need enough volunteers to be able to send plenty to the new campus without leaving your current campus short-handed. Volunteers are easier to find than leaders, but they still are pretty scarce.

  1. You don’t have the right location.

Most experts will tell you location is more important than facility. I would agree. The problem is, when you’re doing church in small rural communities, finding a good facility in a great location on a budget is next to impossible.

  1. You don’t have the right systems in place.

Let’s say you have the first six reasons covered, things can still fall apart if you don’t have the right systems in place. How are you following up with guests? What process do you use to get people connected? What happens the first time someone gives? Have you taken the time to answer these questions in detail?

I want to see churches grow. I want you to succeed. But I want to warn you to be cautious jumping in to multisite. Take your time, and make sure to count the cost. That may make all the difference.

Are you thinking about going multisite? Why or why not? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below, and while you’re here don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

Developing a Focused Plan for Your Church

I recently finished reading The Unstuck Church by Tony Morgan. It should be required reading for every pastor. I have never read a book that so clearly articulates the steps necessary for a church to grow, even those churches who have been stuck for years.

I’m sure I’ll be sharing ideas and thoughts from it for years to come, but in this post I want to share and define the four elements your church needs to develop a plan to move forward.

  1. Mission

The mission defines the primary purpose for the church. Jesus laid it out pretty clearly as recorded in Matthew 28, and churches have put their own wording to it. Basically it should answer the question, why do we exist, in twelve words or less, according to Morgan.

  1. Vision

Many churches and pastors get mission and vision confused or think they’re the same thing. They’re not. While the mission answers the question, why do we exist, the vision should answer the question, where are we going? The vision should have a timetable of between three and five years, and it should be specific and measurable. Bigger vision is always better, as long as it’s realistically possible with the help of God.

  1. Strategy

Now that you have your mission and vision, you need a strategy to accomplish it. Tony Morgan would say that the first step is identifying your growth engines. What are the areas in your church that are most likely to help you grow? For some it’s kids’ ministry. For others it’s music. For others it’s preaching. Step two is defining what’s important now. What are the changes that need to take place? Hires that need to be made? Those types of things. In order to grow, a change is going to have to come.

  1. Values

What are the principles that are going to shape the culture of your church? Your values should drive the actions and decisions of every member of the team. Morgan suggests focusing on internal values first because the character and personality of the leaders will ultimately shape the culture.

I’m a church growth strategy junkie, and these simple definitions were so helpful to me. I love the clarity that Morgan brings to each one.

I would encourage you to take the necessary time to sit down and think through each of these four elements for your church. You will see that these four will form the foundation of everything you do.

Have you taken the time to define each one of these for your church? Why or why not? Leave a comment and let me know, and while you’re here don’t forget to subscribe in order to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

4 Ways to Identify a Vision Vandal

When you ask what vision is in the church world, you’ll get a dozen different definitions. My favorite comes from Bill Hybels. He says, “Vision is a picture of the future that produces passion.” I love that definition. But I’ve also learned the hard way that passion goes two ways.

When God gives you a vision for your life or your church, in your mind you see people rallying behind it because of the difference it’s going to make.

And the majority of people will rally behind it and will be passionate about partnering with you to accomplish it.

On the flip side of that, there are going to be some in your life and your church that are going to be just as passionate about making sure your vision never comes to pass.

I call these people vision vandals.

And they’re in every church just waiting for their chance to strike.

Many of them are great people. They have good intentions. They can even appear to be some of your best friends.

Yet, a new vision brings out the worst in them. Because a new vision means things will have to change, and vision vandals hate change. They will fight it every chance they get.

The saddest part is many times the vandals win, and good pastors lose.

I don’t want that to happen to you.

So, let me give you a few ways to spot these vandals before they hijack your vision.

  1. They want to control rather than serve.

One of the easiest ways to spot them is they’re quick to sign up to be on committees and boards, and yet they never sign up to actually serve anyone. Watch out for families who nominate their relatives. This could be a power move by them to gain more control.

  1. They will manipulate to get their way.

Vandals will always bring complaints to you but never give the names of those complaining. I would advise you to ignore these. Refuse to listen to them unless they give you the name of the person complaining so you can speak directly to them. Most of the time, you’ll find that they are really the person with the complaint, but they want to make you feel like it’s the entire church.

  1. They will talk behind your back and others.

If they have the tendency to come to you to complain or gossip about someone else, just know they’re doing the same thing to you. They will work behind the scenes to erode trust in you so that when you get ready to launch a new vision, ministry, or initiative they can tear it and you down.

  1. They are not team players.

They don’t play well with others. Instead of believing the best about their teammates, they will find a way to complain about them. They will tear down the team’s accomplishments in order to try to make themselves look better.

Many times they will show a complete lack of respect for others. Don’t let this slide. You’ll regret it later.

Ministry is hard enough without having your own people fight against you. Do everything you can to eliminate the vision vandals in your church as soon as possible. Because believe me, given the chance, they’ll eliminate you.

How have you handled vision vandals in your church? Leave a comment and let us know. Also take a second to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

20/20 Vision

I believe I was in second grade when I got my first pair of glasses. In those early years, I moved back and forth between contacts and glasses, but I’ve probably worn glasses exclusively for the past 15 years or so. It can be annoying at times, but I have terrible vision without them.

I have what the experts call astigmatism, which I believe is a fancy word for saying I can’t see stuff.

Google tells me it’s a defect in the lens, which results in distorted images, as light rays are prevented from meeting at a common focus.

No matter what the definition is, the fact is I’m a danger to myself and others when I’m not wearing my glasses.

My vision stinks.

Perhaps you or the church you serve has the same issue.

Scripture tells us, Where there is no vision, the people perish. Proverbs 29:18a

And it’s true. We all know people wondering aimlessly through life, and we all know of churches that have to close their doors because they lost their vision.

Andy Stanley, in his book Visioneering, says vision brings four things into our daily lives. We can also say vision brings these four things into our churches.

  1. Passion

The better your vision, the stronger emotion it invokes. It’s almost impossible to have passion without a vision. And those without a vision live passive lives. A strong vision stirs something within you that can’t be contained.

  1. Motivation

Without a vision for the future, there’s no need for motivation. Motivation needs a destination, otherwise you’re life will always stay in park. Weight Watchers realizes this, that’s why they’re always showing before and after pictures of their customers. If you’re a pastor, a big part of your job is painting a clear picture of what the future could look like for your church.

  1. Direction

Without a vision for where you want to go, you never know where you’ll end up. Clear vision sets the direction of our lives and helps us prioritize what’s important. If it’s not getting us closer to our goal, then it’s not something we need to do.

  1. Purpose

People with a clear vision for their lives are more likely to live their lives on purpose. As Stanley says, “A vision gives you a reason to get up in the morning.” I believe God’s given each of us a purpose. If you haven’t figured out what exactly that is yet, you may want to check your vision.

I can’t express enough how important vision is for your life and your church. It makes all the difference in the world. If your vision isn’t real clear right now, I encourage you to take some time this week to get focused.

Does your church have a crystal clear vision? What about your life? Let us know about it in the comments below, and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get updates on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

5 Signs that You’re the Growth Barrier

Why is your church not growing? Is it the stubborn deacon who refuses to change? The Sunday School teacher who is plotting against you? Or maybe the worship leader who insists on singing “Beulah Land” every Sunday? Chances are it’s not any of those things. More than likely the biggest growth barrier to your church…is you.

That can be hard to accept, however the quicker you accept it, the quicker you can make the changes that are necessary to take your church to the next level.

And don’t feel bad about it. Almost every pastor starts out making these same mistakes, and few of them ever change.

That’s why most churches will never break 200 in weekly attendance.

However, you’re not most pastors, so let’s take a minute and see if you’re making any of these five mistakes.

  1. You’re the Primary Care Giver.

To put it more plainly, you do all the visiting, counseling, and any other ing’s. And your church loves you because of it. It’s probably at the top of your job description, but it’s holding your church back.

  1. You’re Always Available.

Someone needs something, you’re the first person they call. Everyone in the church has your phone number. It may even be on the church sign. They can call any time of day or night. You attempt to be omnipresent and never miss a church event whether it be a prayer meeting or a birthday party. You’re unwillingness to say no to the small things is costing you the opportunity to do big things.

  1. You Don’t Delegate.

See above. You feel bad asking anyone else to do anything, or you don’t think they can do it as well as you. So, you lead every meeting, preach every sermon, mow the yard, take out the trash, and anything else that needs to be done. Even Jesus had a team of 12, and you’re no Jesus. Start giving others responsibility, or you’ll never grow.

  1. You’re a Terrible Planner.

If you don’t know what you’re preaching from week to week, you’re a terrible planner. And don’t give me this waiting on the Holy Spirit to show you. God is the ultimate planner. He planned how this world began, and He’s already planned the end. God had a vision for what He wanted to create and the outcome He wanted to see. Do you?

  1. You Ignore the Numbers.

What was your average attendance last year? How many guests have you had this year? How many salvations? How many baptisms? You don’t track it because you don’t want responsibility for it. If you tracked it, you might have to admit you need to change because what you’re currently doing isn’t working.

Do any of these sound like you? If so, you’ve found the problem, and that’s 90% of fixing it. Now, just be willing to do the other 10% and change.

Have any of these ever described you? How did you change? Let us know by leaving a comment and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

 

Don’t Get Too Comfortable

I like comfortable. You probably do too. You don’t have to stress when things are comfortable. You don’t have anxiety when things are comfortable. You don’t lose sleep when things are comfortable. But I don’t think God likes comfortable.

So, does God want us to be uncomfortable? And if so, why?

I know my wife wants me to be uncomfortable.

She wants me to throw out my comfortable shoes that have a hole in them.

She wants me to try new foods that are out of my comfort zone.

And she would love it if I would leave the comfort of my own house more than I currently do.

It’s not that she really wants me to be uncomfortable. She just wants me to change.

Which makes me uncomfortable.

I have the feeling that God wants the same.

He doesn’t necessarily want us to be uncomfortable, but He does want us to change.

Which means I may have to try some new things. And I may have to give up my old ways. And I may have to let go of some of my preferences. And I may have to get to know new people.

And I may have to get comfortable with being uncomfortable.

And you may have get comfortable with being uncomfortable.

And I may have to embrace change. And you may have to embrace change.

Because God wants to change us.

“This means that anyone who belongs to Christ has become a new person. The old life is gone; a new life has begun!” 2nd Corinthians 5:17

What’s the biggest change you’ve had to make personally in ministry? Why? Let us know by leaving a comment below and take a second to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week

3 Things Passion is Not

I just finished reading Bill Hybels book, Courageous Leadership. If you’ve never read it, do yourself a favor and pick it up here. One of my favorite lines is Hybels’ definition of vision. He says, “Vision is a picture of the future that produces passion.” I don’t know about you, but for me as a pastor, one of the things that fuels me is seeing people live with passion.

One of my favorite scriptures is the promise Jesus gives recorded in John 10:10,

The thief comes only to steal, kill, and destroy. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.

And yet I see so many Christ followers who seem to have lost their passion.

They are living a life that they would describe as far from abundant.

And here’s what I think we need to learn about passion.

  1. Passion is not a personality type.

It’s not something that some people have, and some people don’t. It’s not a spiritual gift. Sometimes passion is raising your hands during worship, but I think more often than not, passion is about the things you do when no one is looking. Passion is the single mom who drags her three kids to church every Sunday. Passion is the teenager who stays home and reads his Bible when everyone else is at the party. Passion is the couple who on the brink of divorce decide to stick it out.

  1. Passion is not a feeling.

Passion and excitement are too very different things. It’s easy to get them confused. If you want to tell them apart, you have to give it time. For example, one of our campuses recently moved into a permanent facility. We’re seeing a lot of new people come, a lot of people taking next steps, and our volunteers are excited to serve every week. I’ll know they’re passionate if they’re still ready to serve every week when we’re not seeing growth. The evidence of passion is perseverance.

  1. Passion is not passive.

How many times have you asked someone to serve and they said, let me pray about it first? Translation, I want to sound spiritual, but I don’t actually want to do anything. If you have passion in your life, someone shouldn’t have to ask you to do something you know you already should be doing. You’re going to want to serve, you’re going to want to read your Bible, you’re going to want to give. Passionate people aren’t passive.

If you’ve lost your passion, you need to get it back. Jesus tells us how in Revelation 2:5

Remember from where you have fallen, repent, and do the things you did at first.

It’s not difficult, you just have to do the things you did when you were passionate. You just have to practice it, even when you don’t feel like it because passion isn’t a feeling. It should be a way of life.

We all lose our passion from time to time, what have you done to get it back? I’d love to hear about it so leave a comment below, and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

3 Qualities Followers Look for in a Leader

Leadership doesn’t happen without relationship. Let’s say that again, leadership doesn’t happen without relationship. The foundation of leadership is relationships. The foundation of ministry is relationships. The foundation of the church is relationships.

And I’m not great at relationships. In fact, several years ago, I would’ve said I was pretty terrible at them.

It’s something I’ve had to work on throughout the years, and while I’ve definitely improved in that area, I’m still not where I’d like to be.

Relationships require you to connect with people’s hearts. Get to know them. Do life with them. Yet, my naturally tendency as an introvert is to isolate myself.

Relationships require you to appreciate people for who they are. Not just tolerate, but appreciate. Yet, my natural tendency is to try to fix people.

So, I’ve really had to be intentional about getting out of my comfort zone in order to build relationships.

Because I know no one is going to follow me unless they trust me, and trust comes from relationships.

Hopefully, that’s not the case for you. Hopefully, you’re great at building relationships, and you have a line of people already following you.

In order to keep them following, you need to have these three qualities.

  1. Encouragement

Everyone struggles with self-doubt. Discouragement is a reality of life. The thing that will keep your followers moving is encouragement. It provides hope. It builds their confidence. It makes them feel good. If you are an encourager, you won’t have to seek people out. They will gravitate to you. People are drawn to leaders who build them up.

  1. Inspiration

A good leader inspires people to follow the vision. They are able to navigate through change and are constantly on the lookout for new opportunities. A good leader understands the organization can’t stay where it is. It constantly has to change in order to reach new people. Your ability to communicate an inspiring vision to your followers will determine your success or failure.

  1. Consistency

Consistency is the glue that holds it all together. People won’t follow an unreliable leader. It doesn’t matter how talented or charismatic you are. They want a leader who is disciplined because there’s something about discipline that inspires people. It makes them want to be a better person.

If you have these three qualities in your life, you’ll be a leader people want to follow. If you don’t have them, work on getting them, otherwise you might not be leading for long.

What do you think about this list? What would you add? Let me know by leaving a comment, and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog in order to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

Breaking 200

We recently broke the 200-attendance barrier at our second campus. I’ve been lucky to be there over the last couple of weeks, and you can feel the excitement and energy in the place. You may not care about trivial things like the number of people who show up to hear you preach each week, and you also may be a liar. You’d be crazy not to care about the attendance.

Author Carl F. George, says in his book How to Break Growth Barriers, “Churches have more in common by their size than by their denomination, tradition, location, age, or any other single, isolatable factor.”

Most churches in America average around 75-80 people in weekly attendance, which surprises me a little.

But most churches rely on their pastor to do the ministry while the congregation sits back and watches.

Many pastors are ok with this because they’re making a living, they kind of like being the center of attention, or they just don’t know any better.

For the rest of you who may be struggling to break that 200 number in weekly attendance, I have some ideas on how you can get there.

  1. Talk about it…a lot.

Your desire to see your church grow shouldn’t be a secret. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. In fact, you should be talking about it every chance you get. People love to be challenged, and so as you’re talking about reaching 200, people start thinking about who they can invite to help hit that goal.

  1. Do what works.

If your church is currently growing, identify the factors that are playing a part in that. Then, keep doing them. In contrast, identify the things that aren’t working, and stop doing them. Focus on what works.

  1. Check yourself before you wreck yourself.

Go back and read my “You’re the Growth Barrier” post, and make sure you’re not making any of the mistakes that will hold your church back. You may have to let go of some things that you enjoy so your church can go to the next level.

  1. Deal with the doubters.

Focusing on growth will ruffle the feathers of those with a small church mentality, and that mentality is especially prevalent in small towns. You may have to remove those doubters from any leadership roles they may have if you can’t get them on board with the vision. Sometimes addition comes through subtraction.

  1. Delegate the care.

The pastor being the person who cares for everyone in the church is the biggest obstacle to growing beyond 100. You have to delegate out the care if you want the church to grow. Small groups or Sunday school classes are a great place to start. Volunteer teams work well also. The church is at its best when the attenders care for one another.

What is your church’s average weekly attendance? Are you satisfied with it? I’d love to hear your thoughts so leave a comment below. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church leadership, growth, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

4 Important Vision Questions

Leadership and vision go hand in hand. You can’t be good at one without the other. If you don’t have a vision for where you want to go, you won’t really be leading anyone anywhere. Likewise, you can have a vision for where you want to go but not have the leadership skills to get you there.

When the church I serve was planted over a decade ago, it had very little vision.

It was an ever so slightly more contemporary copy of the other churches in the community.

Their pastors wore suits and ties; our pastor dropped the suit. Their churches played hymns; our church played a blend. If they were church version 1.0, we were version 1.1.

After the first year, our church attendance had grown by a negative one. No one was looking for church version 1.1. They were looking for version 2.0.

Luckily, our pastor discovered this and got a fresh vision from God for our church moving forward.

Moving from version 1.1 to 2.0 wasn’t without its difficulties. We’ve seen several people leave along the way, but it was still the best thing we’ve ever done.

Before you install a fresh vision into your church, you need to clarify these four questions.

  1. What is God calling us to?

What is God’s unique calling for your church? Who does He want you to reach? The popular answer is young families, but that may not be the case for your church. Look at the churches in your community. Is there a segment of the population that is being overlooked? Look at the gifts of the people in your church. Is there something you can offer that no other church in your community is offering? Clarify your calling.

  1. How are we going to accomplish it?

God didn’t just tell Joshua to take the city of Jericho. He showed him how it was to be done. It didn’t make sense at the time, but it worked out pretty well. Spend some time writing down exactly what you believe it’s going to take to accomplish this calling. You may have to remodel your church. You may have to make a hire that you don’t have the money for. You may need to remove some people from leadership. These are tough decisions that many pastors aren’t willing to make.

  1. Who needs to be involved?

One thing I’ve learned for certain is that it’s impossible to accomplish your calling without involving others. Gather a team around you to start talking about this new vision, get their ideas and support, and then you get their influence. Then work your way through the leadership of the church, to the volunteers, and eventually to the congregation.

  1. When should you begin?

You can have a great idea derailed by terrible timing. You may be looking to move to two services. Don’t try to start it during the summer. Be strategic about your timing. Make sure your church is experiencing momentum and capitalize on it. And whatever you do, don’t begin until you’ve answered the first three questions.

Implementing God’s vision for your church is going to be scary. It takes risk, it takes faith, and it takes perseverance. But if you’ll take the time to think through these four questions, I believe you’ll be much better prepared going forward. Good luck.

Name one big vision you’ve implemented at your church in the comments below. I’d love to hear about it. And while you’re here don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.