Leadership = Influence

If you’ve never read a book by John Maxwell, you’re really doing yourself a disservice. He has more leadership knowledge in his big toe than I have in my entire body. I’ve never met him, and probably never will, and yet he’s had a tremendous influence on my life.

In Maxwell’s book, The 21 Most Powerful Minutes in a Leader’s Day, he says, “Leadership impact increases as influence increases.”

There’s no place that leadership is more important than the local church because the church works primarily through volunteers.

We don’t have the leverage that other organizations do. We’re not offering a salary and benefits.

As pastors and ministry leaders, we have to rely solely on our leadership and influence.

If the leader has no influence with the people they’re trying to lead, then they’re never going to follow.

It’s one thing to be obedient to God. We should certainly do what He says, but for leaders, obedience isn’t enough.

You need people to help accomplish the vision God’s given you, and if you can’t get people to follow you, then you’re going to fail your mission.

So, with that in mind, let me share with you a few thoughts on leadership and influence.

  • Leadership is Influence

Think about it. Leadership is about getting people to follow you. The only way you do that is through influence. The more influence you have the easier it will be to get people to follow you.

  • Our Influence can be Positive or Negative

You already know this. That’s why we’re so concerned about who our kids are hanging out with. You should be just as concerned about who’s leading in your church, especially in kids’ ministry, student ministry, and small groups. A lot of church splits happen because of someone using their influence in a negative way.

  • Good Leaders use their Influence to Add Value

Whenever I write a blog or post to social media, I’m thinking how can I add value to someone else. Otherwise, what’s the point? Before you look to get something out of people, you need to make sure you’ve done a great job pouring into people.

  • With Influence Comes Responsibility

Remember the story about the twelve spies sent into the Promise Land? Caleb and Joshua said we can take the land, but the other ten disagreed and started a rebellion. Their negative influence resulted in every one of their followers dying in the wilderness. Don’t take your influence lightly.

Remember, influence takes time. So, if you’re the new pastor at a church or the new leader of a ministry, it may take some time before people are ready to follow you. Don’t let that discourage you. Be willing to put in the effort it takes to become a great leader.

What are you currently doing to increase your influence? I’d love to hear about it in the comments. While you’re here make sure to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

Why I Haven’t Given Up on Small Groups

If you’ve been following the blog for very long, you’ve probably noticed I have a love/hate relationship with small groups. For the ninety minutes or so I’m attending a group, I love it. Outside of those ninety minutes, I’ve tended to hate it more than anything. But over the past few months, I’m starting to have a Julia Stiles, Ten Things I Hate About You moment with it.

I hate the way you take up a free night

I hate it when the kids get in a fistfight

I hate it when no one wants to lead

Probably because they have an entire group to feed

I hate that I can’t find anyone to lead the ministry

And the fact that no one attends because of ball

But mostly I hate the way I don’t hate you

Not even close, not even a little bit, not even at all.

Before I wrote blogs, I wrote poetry. My mom said I had a gift.

Regardless, the truth is, as much as I want to hate groups, I have to admit I need them.

And so do you.

Here’s why:

  1. Groups are a great way to evangelize.

Your neighbors may not be ready to come to church just yet, but they would attend a group focused around how to make their marriage better. Once they’re a part of your group, they make friendships, their marriage gets better, and they realize maybe they need Jesus.

  1. Groups can be great for discipleship.

I’ve discovered most people aren’t thinking about how to grow closer to God. They have too much going on already, and it gets pushed to the background, unless they’re part of a group that talks about it.

  1. Groups can be a great way to identify and train new leaders.

If someone can lead a successful group, there’s a good chance they can lead a ministry. If they can’t lead a successful group, then you know they probably shouldn’t be leading a ministry. Either way, you’ve discovered something very important without much risk.

The benefits of a healthy group ministry are tremendous. I hesitate to say it because of my past frustrations, but I almost think it’s vital to the health of your church.

And so, I don’t know about you, but I have a lot of work to do in this area because it may be the difference between a stagnant and a growing church.

On a scale of 1-10 how would you rate the small group ministry at your church? Do you have any frustrations? I’d love to hear about it, so leave a comment below and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

An Important Lesson from Carnival Cruise Lines

This summer I had the opportunity to go on a Carnival cruise with a group of pastors who are part of the same association. It was a fun and relaxing trip, and one that gave us the opportunity to talk through some issues our churches are facing. It also reminded me of a very important lesson many churches need to learn: Decide who you’re trying to reach.

It was apparent from the first day that Carnival had yet to decide this, and because of that, the ship felt like it had multiple personalities.

On one hand, they tried to portray a luxurious feel.

On another, they tried to portray they were family friendly.

And another, weird third hand they portrayed a party atmosphere, which in my opinion was probably what they really were. They just weren’t quite ready to fully admit it.

Here are a few observations that led me to this conclusion.

The ship I was on had a very fancy dining room called The Monet. During dinner the first night, a man dressed as a pirate came around to each table, and you were required to have your picture taken with him holding a knife to your throat. To make matters worse, it wasn’t even a good-looking pirate costume.

The ship did have a play area for kids on one of the tops decks, but the toys looked to have been thrown together by going to random yard sales. There was no rhyme or reason to it, and I never saw anyone on staff tending to it or cleaning the toys.

They did have a slide on one of the main decks, which was an attraction for kids, but it also overlooked the party pool.

They had an art gallery next to the arcade and casino.

I could go on and on.

In their attempt to appeal to everyone, they missed their opportunity to be great for someone.

Nothing they did was bad, but nothing they did was extraordinary either.

In the end, I’m guessing everyone left with just an ok experience.

So, what does this have to do with your church? Everything.

Far too many churches try to be all things to all people and end up being just ok at everything.

Here’s the problem with that. No one talks about ok. No one thinks about ok. And no one invites his or her friends to experience ok.

So, decide who you want to reach.

If it’s young families, then make sure your kid’s ministry is extraordinary.

If it’s creatives, make sure your worship service is on point.

If it’s retired people, make sure your senior ministry is going strong and you sing every hymn in the book.

Just whatever you do, don’t settle for ok. Ok?

Have you ever been on a cruise? Would you ever go on one again? Why or why? Let me know by leaving a comment below, and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.