3 Things Passion is Not

I just finished reading Bill Hybels book, Courageous Leadership. If you’ve never read it, do yourself a favor and pick it up here. One of my favorite lines is Hybels’ definition of vision. He says, “Vision is a picture of the future that produces passion.” I don’t know about you, but for me as a pastor, one of the things that fuels me is seeing people live with passion.

One of my favorite scriptures is the promise Jesus gives recorded in John 10:10,

The thief comes only to steal, kill, and destroy. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.

And yet I see so many Christ followers who seem to have lost their passion.

They are living a life that they would describe as far from abundant.

And here’s what I think we need to learn about passion.

  1. Passion is not a personality type.

It’s not something that some people have, and some people don’t. It’s not a spiritual gift. Sometimes passion is raising your hands during worship, but I think more often than not, passion is about the things you do when no one is looking. Passion is the single mom who drags her three kids to church every Sunday. Passion is the teenager who stays home and reads his Bible when everyone else is at the party. Passion is the couple who on the brink of divorce decide to stick it out.

  1. Passion is not a feeling.

Passion and excitement are too very different things. It’s easy to get them confused. If you want to tell them apart, you have to give it time. For example, one of our campuses recently moved into a permanent facility. We’re seeing a lot of new people come, a lot of people taking next steps, and our volunteers are excited to serve every week. I’ll know they’re passionate if they’re still ready to serve every week when we’re not seeing growth. The evidence of passion is perseverance.

  1. Passion is not passive.

How many times have you asked someone to serve and they said, let me pray about it first? Translation, I want to sound spiritual, but I don’t actually want to do anything. If you have passion in your life, someone shouldn’t have to ask you to do something you know you already should be doing. You’re going to want to serve, you’re going to want to read your Bible, you’re going to want to give. Passionate people aren’t passive.

If you’ve lost your passion, you need to get it back. Jesus tells us how in Revelation 2:5

Remember from where you have fallen, repent, and do the things you did at first.

It’s not difficult, you just have to do the things you did when you were passionate. You just have to practice it, even when you don’t feel like it because passion isn’t a feeling. It should be a way of life.

We all lose our passion from time to time, what have you done to get it back? I’d love to hear about it so leave a comment below, and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

3 Qualities Followers Look for in a Leader

Leadership doesn’t happen without relationship. Let’s say that again, leadership doesn’t happen without relationship. The foundation of leadership is relationships. The foundation of ministry is relationships. The foundation of the church is relationships.

And I’m not great at relationships. In fact, several years ago, I would’ve said I was pretty terrible at them.

It’s something I’ve had to work on throughout the years, and while I’ve definitely improved in that area, I’m still not where I’d like to be.

Relationships require you to connect with people’s hearts. Get to know them. Do life with them. Yet, my naturally tendency as an introvert is to isolate myself.

Relationships require you to appreciate people for who they are. Not just tolerate, but appreciate. Yet, my natural tendency is to try to fix people.

So, I’ve really had to be intentional about getting out of my comfort zone in order to build relationships.

Because I know no one is going to follow me unless they trust me, and trust comes from relationships.

Hopefully, that’s not the case for you. Hopefully, you’re great at building relationships, and you have a line of people already following you.

In order to keep them following, you need to have these three qualities.

  1. Encouragement

Everyone struggles with self-doubt. Discouragement is a reality of life. The thing that will keep your followers moving is encouragement. It provides hope. It builds their confidence. It makes them feel good. If you are an encourager, you won’t have to seek people out. They will gravitate to you. People are drawn to leaders who build them up.

  1. Inspiration

A good leader inspires people to follow the vision. They are able to navigate through change and are constantly on the lookout for new opportunities. A good leader understands the organization can’t stay where it is. It constantly has to change in order to reach new people. Your ability to communicate an inspiring vision to your followers will determine your success or failure.

  1. Consistency

Consistency is the glue that holds it all together. People won’t follow an unreliable leader. It doesn’t matter how talented or charismatic you are. They want a leader who is disciplined because there’s something about discipline that inspires people. It makes them want to be a better person.

If you have these three qualities in your life, you’ll be a leader people want to follow. If you don’t have them, work on getting them, otherwise you might not be leading for long.

What do you think about this list? What would you add? Let me know by leaving a comment, and don’t forget to subscribe to the blog in order to get tips on church growth, leadership, and more delivered to your inbox each week.

Breaking 200

We recently broke the 200-attendance barrier at our second campus. I’ve been lucky to be there over the last couple of weeks, and you can feel the excitement and energy in the place. You may not care about trivial things like the number of people who show up to hear you preach each week, and you also may be a liar. You’d be crazy not to care about the attendance.

Author Carl F. George, says in his book How to Break Growth Barriers, “Churches have more in common by their size than by their denomination, tradition, location, age, or any other single, isolatable factor.”

Most churches in America average around 75-80 people in weekly attendance, which surprises me a little.

But most churches rely on their pastor to do the ministry while the congregation sits back and watches.

Many pastors are ok with this because they’re making a living, they kind of like being the center of attention, or they just don’t know any better.

For the rest of you who may be struggling to break that 200 number in weekly attendance, I have some ideas on how you can get there.

  1. Talk about it…a lot.

Your desire to see your church grow shouldn’t be a secret. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. In fact, you should be talking about it every chance you get. People love to be challenged, and so as you’re talking about reaching 200, people start thinking about who they can invite to help hit that goal.

  1. Do what works.

If your church is currently growing, identify the factors that are playing a part in that. Then, keep doing them. In contrast, identify the things that aren’t working, and stop doing them. Focus on what works.

  1. Check yourself before you wreck yourself.

Go back and read my “You’re the Growth Barrier” post, and make sure you’re not making any of the mistakes that will hold your church back. You may have to let go of some things that you enjoy so your church can go to the next level.

  1. Deal with the doubters.

Focusing on growth will ruffle the feathers of those with a small church mentality, and that mentality is especially prevalent in small towns. You may have to remove those doubters from any leadership roles they may have if you can’t get them on board with the vision. Sometimes addition comes through subtraction.

  1. Delegate the care.

The pastor being the person who cares for everyone in the church is the biggest obstacle to growing beyond 100. You have to delegate out the care if you want the church to grow. Small groups or Sunday school classes are a great place to start. Volunteer teams work well also. The church is at its best when the attenders care for one another.

What is your church’s average weekly attendance? Are you satisfied with it? I’d love to hear your thoughts so leave a comment below. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the blog to get tips on church leadership, growth, and more delivered to your inbox each week.